Designers and accessibility

UX/IXD and Visual designers have different roles in creating accessible products. Read more below to learn about each designer's responsibilities.


User experience designers / Interaction designers

User experience designers / Interaction designers

User experience (UX) and Interaction designers (IXD) professionals need to understand the interaction models of people with disabilities on user interfaces, and build their designs with the intention to accommodate for those use cases and be able to communicate the interactions model (e.g. functionality is it a link or a button).

Defining the interaction model helps to build out documentation and identifies existing accessibility patterns that were built into the product. The documentation supports the visual design, coding and testing.

An advanced understanding of accessibility is to look at the business requirements for a project and see opportunities to amplify an experience for people with different needs that might have a specific need for that service.

User experience (UX) and Interaction designers (IXD) professionals need to understand the interaction models of people with disabilities on user interfaces, and build their designs with the intention to accommodate for those use cases and be able to communicate the interactions model (e.g. functionality is it a link or a button).

Defining the interaction model helps to build out documentation and identifies existing accessibility patterns that were built into the product. The documentation supports the visual design, coding and testing.

An advanced understanding of accessibility is to look at the business requirements for a project and see opportunities to amplify an experience for people with different needs that might have a specific need for that service.


Visual design

Visual design

Visual designers ensure that the colours, fonts, shapes, and general visual representation as a whole are inclusive. Accessible design is a clear representation of content and the intended semantics of that structure, based on the visual design. The visual design and annotated interactions allow developers to code accordingly (eg. Unordered lists vs. tables, headers vs. strong text, buttons vs. links).

A more advanced understanding of visual design and accessibility considers how the brain consumes colours, shape, and layouts, and how different methods of organizing content can create better experiences for people of all needs. Design governs the intended experience and defines the requirements for the developers and testers, which ensures that accessibility is carried throughout the project.

Visual designers ensure that the colours, fonts, shapes, and general visual representation as a whole are inclusive. Accessible design is a clear representation of content and the intended semantics of that structure, based on the visual design. The visual design and annotated interactions allow developers to code accordingly (eg. Unordered lists vs. tables, headers vs. strong text, buttons vs. links).

A more advanced understanding of visual design and accessibility considers how the brain consumes colours, shape, and layouts, and how different methods of organizing content can create better experiences for people of all needs. Design governs the intended experience and defines the requirements for the developers and testers, which ensures that accessibility is carried throughout the project.


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