Accessibility


Accessibility


Accessibility for content creators

Writing for accessibility is important at TELUS. This ensures all customers, team members and audiences, regardless of ability or environment, can easily use a product or service. Accessibility is a legal requirement, mandated by the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) and the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC).


Accessibility for design


Colour contrast


Digital accessibility fundamentals


High contrast themes

Windows high contrast mode and Firefox high contrast mode (on Mac OSX and Windows) allow the user to customize stylesheets at either the OS level or the browser level.

It strips out the visual design, and leave the semantic code in a more raw state, where default HTML states are more easily seen and background images are removed entirely from the screen to reduce clutter.


    Keyboard alternative experience

    The keyboard alone/alternative standard allows our customers to decide how they want to use our website and mobile app.

    Customers who may have motor skill differences like broken arms, arthritis, tremors, or difficulty in using any minor motor skills due to physical disabilities will benefit from these standard practices.

    Customers who use technologies like screen magnification software also benefit from using keyboards accessibility, in conjunction with a mouse to navigate the desktop experience.

    It is also common for people to use a keyboard to navigate quicker than mouse users.


      Motion and animation accessibility

      Animations, gifs, parallax, and many other types of movement can make our customers feel sick when they engage with our more modern interfaces.

      These guides help to break down what to do.


        Multimedia and document accessibility

        Anything that is on a server and available for consumption like video, audio, email, slide decks, document files, PDFs are required to meet our digital standards.


          Our commitment to accessibility

          At TELUS we’re committed to putting our customer’s needs first regardless of their abilities, devices or screen size. We want all our customers to enjoy a great digital experience, so accessibility is at the heart of every experience.


            Screen readers

            Screen readers use the semantic code matched with the accessibility tree and API to understand and navigate the content. 

            By following these Guides you will be able to support our customers with screen readers, and also other assistive technologies that use the same APIs and trees to communicate with your application.  Example: Speech recognition software, Text-to-speech, and many more.

            Tools

            1. NVDA

            Text resize and Zoom

            Text resize and text zoom are built into the operating systems on our desktops and mobile devices, as well as in our browsers. Our interfaces need to accommodate the reflow that will occur without impeding the readability or function of the content.

            When we increase the size of the content we also need many of our guidelines to be retested since often we adapt the design when we reach certain endpoints.

            These guides will help you make sure your content works for customers who increase their font or text size.

              Accessibility for content creators

              Writing for accessibility is important at TELUS. This ensures all customers, team members and audiences, regardless of ability or environment, can easily use a product or service. Accessibility is a legal requirement, mandated by the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) and the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC).


              Accessibility for design


              Colour contrast


              Digital accessibility fundamentals


              High contrast themes

              Windows high contrast mode and Firefox high contrast mode (on Mac OSX and Windows) allow the user to customize stylesheets at either the OS level or the browser level.

              It strips out the visual design, and leave the semantic code in a more raw state, where default HTML states are more easily seen and background images are removed entirely from the screen to reduce clutter.


              Keyboard alternative experience

              The keyboard alone/alternative standard allows our customers to decide how they want to use our website and mobile app.

              Customers who may have motor skill differences like broken arms, arthritis, tremors, or difficulty in using any minor motor skills due to physical disabilities will benefit from these standard practices.

              Customers who use technologies like screen magnification software also benefit from using keyboards accessibility, in conjunction with a mouse to navigate the desktop experience.

              It is also common for people to use a keyboard to navigate quicker than mouse users.


              Motion and animation accessibility

              Animations, gifs, parallax, and many other types of movement can make our customers feel sick when they engage with our more modern interfaces.

              These guides help to break down what to do.


              Multimedia and document accessibility

              Anything that is on a server and available for consumption like video, audio, email, slide decks, document files, PDFs are required to meet our digital standards.


              Our commitment to accessibility

              At TELUS we’re committed to putting our customer’s needs first regardless of their abilities, devices or screen size. We want all our customers to enjoy a great digital experience, so accessibility is at the heart of every experience.


              Screen readers

              Screen readers use the semantic code matched with the accessibility tree and API to understand and navigate the content. 

              By following these Guides you will be able to support our customers with screen readers, and also other assistive technologies that use the same APIs and trees to communicate with your application.  Example: Speech recognition software, Text-to-speech, and many more.


              Text resize and Zoom

              Text resize and text zoom are built into the operating systems on our desktops and mobile devices, as well as in our browsers. Our interfaces need to accommodate the reflow that will occur without impeding the readability or function of the content.

              When we increase the size of the content we also need many of our guidelines to be retested since often we adapt the design when we reach certain endpoints.

              These guides will help you make sure your content works for customers who increase their font or text size.